Per Bastemhet

Posts Tagged ‘Kemetic Orthodoxy

Monolatry is not monotheism

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In my last post on monolatry I mentioned I would explore how monolatry is not a monotheism.  I think the information in the last post combined with this information from Wim van den Dungen’s article "On Henotheism."  All quotes are from this article.

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Written by Bastemhet

July 29, 2011 at 7:22 pm

Monolatry as defined for Kemetic Orthodox practice by the Nisut of KO

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For those who have been following the posts on this blog, you may have noticed that I have more than one post on how the netjeru were conceived by the Kemetic people, and how that works out for us modern practitioners today.  My view on this has evolved, starting with the essay I wrote on the Conceptions of God.  Then I looked into ante-rational henotheism in my post of the same name.  My last post was my attempt to try and understand monolatry and how it differs from henotheism, as well as how this played out in antiquity.  However it seemed that rational henotheism and monolatry seemed to be identical, and try as I might, I could not find anything on the internet to help with further understanding.  So, I asked Rev. Siuda on the HoN boards why she described the theology as monolatry and why as such instead of as henotheism.  Here is what she had to say:

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Written by Bastemhet

July 29, 2011 at 7:03 pm

Kemetic Calendar

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This post I intend to be a gigantic compendium of all the research I’ve done on the ancient Kemetic calendar.  By reading this one should be able to create their own calendar with accurate festival dates for their area, or configure a fixed, ideal calendar that will line up with our current Julian calendar. (note as of July 31: this is by no means complete information.  What I’m doing as of now is using the HoN calendar [which is a hybrid calendar and not the same as an ancient calendar] and one can calculate wep renpet in part III- this is convenient because they also calculate with leap year in mind, unfortunately it’s only available to members.  You can also use Kerry Wisner’s calendar for the same purpose.)

Table of Contents:

I. Special problems of the Kemetic calendar

II. Fixed ideal or unfixed traditional?

III. How to create your own traditional calendar with the wandering year

IV. How to create an ideal, fixed calendar

V. Festival dates and other helpful information

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Written by Bastemhet

June 24, 2011 at 2:06 pm

Conceptions of netjer: One? Many? And more importantly, when?

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While reviewing my post on ante-rational henotheism I realized that while there was a lot of dense information, it wasn’t necessarily formulated in a way that helped to explain clearly and to a well-formed conclusion.  There is also a discussion I had with a co-religionist in which speaking with him helped to formulate and coagulate my ideas and research on how the ancient Kemetics conceived of their own deities.  I’ll be summarizing my findings in this post in order to tie up any loose ends.

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Written by Bastemhet

June 23, 2011 at 5:23 pm

ante-rational henotheism

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I was reading this article about netjer  by Wim van den Dungen recently and found it to be one of the best explanations that I have found of the way that polyvalent logic functioned in Kemetic religious thought.  I have thought that there seems to be a divide in popular attempts to approach the divine, from the “Brahman” idea that all deities are (incomplete) manifestations of a God(head) (which you see in Kemetic Orthodoxy), to the idea that the deities are independent and self-sufficient beings from the creator deity but are always seen as part of a retinue or grouping (triad, ennead, etc.).

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Written by Bastemhet

September 9, 2010 at 11:33 pm

42 Declarations of Innocence: Introduction

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In order to facilitate further study as well as personal reflection and affirmation, I made these prayer beads.

Prayer Beads

The beads total up to the number 42, with one extra bead to secure the knot for the ankh attached.  The blue stones are 15mm lapis lazuli, the spacers are gold filled glass beads (I think).  I used double knots between each bead and I mimicked the form that rosaries take because I like how that looks, and I also have some personal significance with this shape.  If you would like to make your own, it would not be incongruous to simply leave it as a circle, as Ritner in “The Mechanics of Ancient Egyptian Magical Practice” says the magic circle was a symbol of protection.  The shenu is also similar in the shape of a circle and a symbol of eternal protection.  This face of the ankh is actually the back, the other side has some hieroglyphic gobbledygook that I’m not really that interested in.

I will be getting the actual purifications themselves and their interpretations from the archives of Kemetic Orthodoxy’s Daily Devotions.  Information for purifications 1-13 can be found here, numbers 14-30 can be found here, and numbers 31-42 can be found here.  The purpose of my using this information is to get a handle on what the actual purifications are referring to since this information is not necessarily readily understood because it references (some) gods or places that I am not familiar with.  However the interpretation of Rev. Siuda’s translations and their application to my life is completely personal.

The declarations of innocence originate from the Chapters of Coming Forth by Day, or Pert-em-Hru, specifically from Chapter 125.  They are not moral laws nor commandments, which Kemet didn’t have, but were actually short prayers to local gods of Kemet, followed by a purification.  The purpose of these purifications was for priests to  recite the things they have not done in order to purify themselves before they approach netjer in shrine.  The deceased are expected to do this as well since they are expected to approach Ausir to be judged in the afterlife after having made themselves pure.  These as well as the wisdom literatures we can use as moral guidelines, as they were the indicative of what behavior was considered appropriate in that culture.

From this point on I’ll be heading each post that deals with the declarations of innocence as Purification #x.

Written by Bastemhet

July 24, 2010 at 4:19 am